Talvar


This is a review of the movie ‘Talvar’ written by Parthib Chandra (Mule) of Class VIII (2017).

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The people screamed for justice. The media screamed for justice. The government screamed for justice, for that’s where the votes are. And justice is what was served, but the Indian version of it. And Indian justice is, simply put, injustice. Perhaps no event in the recent history has been a better example of this than the Aarushi double murder case, as portrayed by the movie.

We all know the story. We all read the screaming words ‘TALWARS ACQUITTED’ on the papers, the same papers which, some years back, screamed ‘TALWARS MURDER DAUGHTER IN HONOUR KILLING,’ the same papers which convinced the judge of the verdict before the trials began. But do we know the true story? Do we know to what extent the nation’s incompetence went?

A new CBI director determined to not glorify his predecessor, determined to save the face of his police chief friend who suggested the theory of the honour killing. A judge determined to sentence Aarushi’s parents before the trial begins. The media determined to sell scores of papers with juicy gossip rather than the truth. Households determined to gossip about how barbaric Aarushi’s parents were. The true murderer determined to spread rumours which might help convict the wrong people. What was one honest CBI investigator against all that? He was an insignificant grain of sand facing the tide.

Yes, huge population of patriotic people are going to be enraged at the words “Indian justice is injustice.” They will argue “But they did get acquitted, what about that?” Sad thing is that it was just pure luck that the case was heard by a sound judge. Such judges are not commonplace. They are the exceptions who prove the rule.

“She was reading ‘3 mistakes of my life.’ Hence, she must have made three mistakes for which her father became angry and killed her!” the police reasoned. Any sane person would have laughed at such logic, as I and my classmates did. But did the nation laugh? Did the judge laugh, who convicted the innocent?

Aarushi’s parents were lucky enough to be released after 5 years in prison, though their life is now forever tainted. But who knows how many countless such people have gone through the same fate, if not worse? This case was one that was brought into light, out of the millions of others in which the victims simply faded into oblivion. No, erupting in hue and cry over one case isn’t enough, correcting mistakes isn’t enough. Such mistakes must be prevented, killed from the roots. The rust from the sword of justice must be removed, the blindfolds put back, the balances balanced.

2 thoughts on “Talvar

  1. Subrata Roy November 14, 2017 / 9:14 PM

    There are many who are unfortunate to be wrongly victimised like that of the “Talwars” .This review clearly reflects the condition of the Indian Judiciary System.Very good analysis, Parthib.

    Like

  2. Anonymous September 18, 2018 / 2:49 PM

    There are many who are unfortunate to be wrongly victimised like that of the “Talwars” .This review clearly reflects the condition of the Indian Judiciary System.Very good analysis, Parthib.

    Like

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